with light and love

Deep in the forest on Farmer John’s farm live two gnomes.  They have red caps with a sparkle on top, mossy green jackets, mossy green pants, and red boots with turned-up toes.  They also have beards, of course.  One is called Pepper Pot because he likes pepper.  He loves pepper!  . . . The other gnome is called Pine Cone.  He got stuck inside a pine cone when he was young.  . . .  That’s how he got his name. 

Eggs for the Hunting by Reg Down

The Pine Cone/Pepper Pot color page is at  Gnome Coloring Page

When Margaret and I were planning this puppet swap, I struggled over my story choice for the marionettes because I hated leaving out Pine Cone and Pepper Pot.  Well this post is my inclusion solution!  It also gives a way for kids to participate in making puppets for your plays at home.   Now your Tiptoes and Jeremy Mouse marionettes can have their 2 gnome friends. 

The Gnome Coloring page could be printed on card stock for a simple stick puppet or for shadow puppet plays.  If you ( or your kids) are feeling a bit more ambitious, then you can make a paper puppet with a little more wiggle. 

Gnome Stick Puppet

supplies & tools:
Gnome Puppet Pattern
construction paper or cardstock
crayons
stick glue
tape
chopsticks (thank you, Doc Chey’s!)
scissors
small brads (2 per puppet)
small hole punch (the hole needs to match the size of your brad anchors.  if you don’t have a small hole punch you can make do with a pin or exacto knife point – adult use only)
roving- just a small bit for the beards, or you can always use colored paper
 

These puppets can be made from construction paper.  If you choose this method, then use the Gnome Puppet Pattern as an actual pattern that you cut out and use to trace the pieces onto your various colors of construction paper.   

They can be made on cardstock and colored with crayons.  If you choose this method, then print and color the Gnome Puppet Pattern before you cut it out.  We glued the hat on the head, the neck to the jacket, the hands to the sleeves and the boots to the pants.  It is a bit easier if you glue the beard on the chin after you have attached the arms & legs with the brads.  We chose to use our stick glue so we could control the amount (it only takes a little).  You want to make sure you don’t get any glue in your “joints.” 

Two happy stick puppet gnomes ready for adventure! 

Stick puppets made by Ivie Wildman (8yo)

Add chop stick so the puppet is held from above or below.  I was thinking about marionettes when making the puppet with construction paper, so I attached mine to be held from above.  My daughter wanted to hold hers from below and so she taped the chop stick to the back of the head with the handle coming down. 

You can reference the Gnome Coloring Page when you are positioning the arms, hands, legs and boots on the stick puppets. 

The use of the Pine Cone and Pepper Pot images is done with the permission and blessing of Reg Down, the author of the Tiptoes books and more!    (Sir Gillygad is wonderful and waits in my closet for the 9th birthday) 

Remember, our puppet swap sign-ups end July 24th.  All the specifics on joining are waiting for you at this invitation. 

©rw 2012

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